Menu of Services

Female Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on Your First Visit

Read more:

Male Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on Your First Visit

Read more:

Pediatric Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on the First Visit

Read more:

Orthopaedic Services and Treatments

Read more:

Cancer Rehabilitation Treatments

Read more:

Certified Attain Treatments for Incontinence

Read more:

Fascial Stretch Therapy

Read more:

blog

Heather and her staff blog about male and female chronic pelvic pain, prostatitis, incontinence, upcoming events and more

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When talking to some of my patients, I’ve noticed that lubricants have a negative stigma.

For instance, women believe that something must be wrong with them if they have to use a lubricant.

Yes, there are natural causes with aging that can cause vaginal dryness, but our society has also skewed the way we view our natural lubrication. Every woman has glands in their vagina that secrete various amounts of lubrication. My thought is why not add to the fun, because lubricants can definitely be that!

Using a lubricant can enhance the pleasure, decrease friction, prevent pain/discomfort, and prolong sexual excitement, so why wouldn’t you want to use it. Now finding the right lubricant for you can be a challenge, but no worries this will help you get started. We will start with some basics when looking for your soulmate lubricant.

Heather Jeffcoat, DPT visits the Great Wall of China
Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

I just returned to Los Angeles after completing an amazing eight day trip to Beijing, China. There I had the opportunity to work with the Chinese Olympic Committee,their rehabilitation staff and athletes. I gave two lectures with hands-on labs to their physiotherapists on Hip Impingement and Cyclist's Syndrome (Pudendal neuralgia in cyclists). Did I talk about the pelvic floor muscles in both lectures? You bet I did! Monica is my awesome Mandarin translator pictured standing next to me below.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

We are now more convenient to Silver Lake, Atwater Village, Eagle Rock, Glendale, Montrose, La Crescenta, Pasadena, Burbank and surrounding areas!

We are excited to announce the opening of our newest physical therapy location in Montrose, CA. Right outside of Glendale and Montrose sits our 1,800 square foot office at the connection of the 2 and 210 freeways.

Complete with four treatment rooms and a large gym space including a pilates reformer and tower (with more equipment to come soon!), we are even better able to support our patients’ needs specializing in orthopaedic and pelvic floor physical therapy. We look forward to hosting classes, seminars, and course trainings for our community.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When I talk to friends and family about pelvic floor physical therapy, many think I only treat women. Pelvic floor muscles are found in everyone! The male population can also suffer from pain or dysfunction in the pelvic region. Have you ever asked yourself "Why does my penis hurt?" or "Why do my testicles hurt?" or "Why is it hard to start my flow of urine?" or "Why do I have to pee all the time?". We'll start answering those questions. Some diagnoses include chronic testicular pain, groin pain, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and pelvic floor dysfunction. In today’s blog, we will be focusing on chronic testicle pain or pain in the testes, also known as, chronic orchialgia.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

May is Pelvic Pain Awareness month and healthy bowel habits are important component to consider in overall pelvic health.

What is your poop telling you?

A lot of our clients with pelvic floor dysfunction, pelvic pain, endometriosis, and prolapse have some trouble with their bowels. IBS and other bowel-related issues can cause abdominal pain, rectal pain, and pelvic floor problems. It’s a connection that is very important to consider!

Today we will discuss poop color, texture, and size. While many of us may turn our heads when we flush, there are some important details about your health that can be gathered from the color of your poop, so consider taking a gander at your poop before you flush it away.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Did you know specific food and drinks can irritate your bladder?

Do you ever feel strong urinary urgency or frequency? Do you have urinary incontinence? Have you been diagnosed with a bladder control problem, overactive bladder, or interstitial cystitis? If so, you may notice some days symptoms can be worse than others. This can be attributed to the TYPES of foods and drinks you consume, also referred to as bladder irritants. Bladder irritants can aggravate symptoms such as bladder pain, urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Did you know that riding a bike that doesn’t fit your body can cause and exacerbate nerve and orthopedic problems? Avoid nerve, muscle and joint pain with the following tips!

Before We Begin: Ask for Help

If you are spinning at a gym or in a class, ask for assistance from cycling instructors if you need help setting up your bike. Everyone needs help doing this when they begin, so don't be shy!

If you are cycling at home, come see us at the clinic or have us come out to your house! Clinic owner Heather Jeffcoat, DPT does custom fit assessments in our Sherman Oaks office using the Peloton, and travels in the greater Los Angeles area.

Where is your tush?

Before you sit on the bike, know where you should be sitting!

Your sitting bones should be seated on the back (widest part) of your bike saddle. Sitting correctly on the bike will be one of the most important factors to keeping you from developing orthopedic or nerve issues.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

How to prevent back pain for your child

With the school year upon us, kids everywhere are settling into their routines including schlepping items from home to school and extracurricular activities.

Heavy backpacks can lead to back and shoulder pain, injuries, and soreness. Here are a few tips to stay healthy when using a backpack.

Symptoms to watch for:

Carrying a backpack that is too heavy for you can lead to back pain, spinal injuries down the road, as well as an injury to the brachial plexus, the nerve network that goes down the front of the neck and shoulder to your arms, hands, and fingers.

Here are some symptoms to watch out for:

  • Back Pain
  • Numbness, tingling, prickling, or burning sensations in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Weakness in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Pain in the arms, hands, forearms, or shoulders
  • Pain that radiates down the arm
  • Neck and shoulder pain

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Childhood Constipation and how Pelvic Floor Therapy Can Help

Does your kiddo have a hard time passing bowel movements?

If the answer is yes, you are not alone. According to (Mugie et al. (2011) up to about 30% of children experience constipation. In fact, kids admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain are most often diagnosed with constipation (Caperell, Pitetti, & Cross, 2013).

Kids who don’t get treatment for their constipation may start falling into muscle holding patterns that persist into adulthood. This means that childhood constipation problems may lead to adult constipation and other pelvic floor issues.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

While occasional daytime and nighttime accidents (bowel and urine) are a normal part of younger childhood, kids can experience problematic urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction just like adults.

In this article we will discuss the signs of an underlying pelvic floor dysfunction in children and how pelvic floor therapy can help.

When is it a problem?

Occasional daytime and nighttime accidents are a normal part of growing up. However, if accidents are interfering with a kid’s social engagement, progress in school, or their self-image, then you may consider seeking extra help from a pediatric urologist or pelvic floor therapist.

Signs and Symptoms of Pediatric Incontinence or Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

  • Leaks urine or bowel with laughter (giggle incontinence), coughing, or exercise (jumping on a trampoline, sprinting, etc.)
  • Frequent urination and frequent urge to urinate
  • Chronic constipation or diarrhea
  • Chronic urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Daytime wetting that interferes with school, social engagement, or self image
  • Nighttime wetting that interferes with sleep, hygiene, or self image
  • Inability to fully void urine or evacuate bowel on the toilet

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Part 2 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease (Gallo, L. (2014).) outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men. These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover lifestyle and sexual habits that can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Part 1 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men (Gallo, L., 2014). These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover dietary and toileting habits which can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

  • 2.png8.png2.png5.png0.png4.png
  • Visitors:
  • Today 26
  • |
  • Yesterday 116
  • |
  • This week 314
  • |
  • This month 1926
  • |
  • Total 282504

© 2013 Heather Jeffcoat, all rights reserved | Site credits