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Heather and her staff blog about male and female chronic pelvic pain, prostatitis, incontinence, upcoming events and more

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Did you know that riding a bike that doesn’t fit your body can cause and exacerbate nerve and orthopedic problems? Avoid nerve, muscle and joint pain with the following tips!

Before We Begin: Ask for Help

If you are spinning at a gym or in a class, ask for assistance from cycling instructors if you need help setting up your bike. Everyone needs help doing this when they begin, so don't be shy!

If you are cycling at home, come see us at the clinic or have us come out to your house! Clinic owner Heather Jeffcoat, DPT does custom fit assessments in our Sherman Oaks office using the Peloton, and travels in the greater Los Angeles area.

 

Where is your tush?

Before you sit on the bike, know where you should be sitting!

Your sitting bones should be seated on the back (widest part) of your bike saddle. Sitting correctly on the bike will be one of the most important factors to keeping you from developing orthopedic or nerve issues.

downstroke correct

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How to prevent back pain for your child

With the school year upon us, kids everywhere are settling into their routines including schlepping items from home to school and extracurricular activities.

Heavy backpacks can lead to back and shoulder pain, injuries, and soreness. Here are a few tips to stay healthy when using a backpack.

Symptoms to watch for:

Carrying a backpack that is too heavy for you can lead to back pain, spinal injuries down the road, as well as an injury to the brachial plexus, the nerve network that goes down the front of the neck and shoulder to your arms, hands, and fingers.

Here are some symptoms to watch out for:

  • Back Pain
  • Numbness, tingling, prickling, or burning sensations in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Weakness in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Pain in the arms, hands, forearms, or shoulders
  • Pain that radiates down the arm
  • Neck and shoulder pain

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Childhood Constipation and how Pelvic Floor Therapy Can Help

Does your kiddo have a hard time passing bowel movements?

If the answer is yes, you are not alone. According to (Mugie et al. (2011) up to about 30% of children experience constipation. In fact, kids admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain are most often diagnosed with constipation (Caperell, Pitetti, & Cross, 2013).

Kids who don’t get treatment for their constipation may start falling into muscle holding patterns that persist into adulthood. This means that childhood constipation problems may lead to adult constipation and other pelvic floor issues.

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While occasional daytime and nighttime accidents (bowel and urine) are a normal part of younger childhood, kids can experience problematic urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction just like adults.

In this article we will discuss the signs of an underlying pelvic floor dysfunction in children and how pelvic floor therapy can help.

When is it a problem?

Occasional daytime and nighttime accidents are a normal part of growing up. However, if accidents are interfering with a kid’s social engagement, progress in school, or their self-image, then you may consider seeking extra help from a pediatric urologist or pelvic floor therapist.

Signs and Symptoms of Pediatric Incontinence or Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

  • Leaks urine or bowel with laughter (giggle incontinence), coughing, or exercise (jumping on a trampoline, sprinting, etc.)
  • Frequent urination and frequent urge to urinate
  • Chronic constipation or diarrhea
  • Chronic urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Daytime wetting that interferes with school, social engagement, or self image
  • Nighttime wetting that interferes with sleep, hygiene, or self image
  • Inability to fully void urine or evacuate bowel on the toilet

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Part 2 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease (Gallo, L. (2014).) outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men. These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover lifestyle and sexual habits that can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

 

13 Evidence-Based Recommendations for Managing Prostatitis Related Pelvic Pain

 Part Two: 7-13 (find recommendations 1-6 here)

Healthy Sexual Habits

7) Experience Regular Ejaculation… But Not Too Much! Moderation is Key.

Gaining healthy sexual habits that are in moderation is important to managing chronic pelvic pain in male clients. Too much activity and ejaculation can exacerbate pain, yet total abstinence can also create pelvic congestion, which will worsen pain.

In one study reviewed by Gallo, prolonged periods without ejaculation was connected to a higher incidence of prostatitis. Yet, Collins et al. (2002) found that having more than seven ejaculations per month was associated with 1.2–1.5-fold increased odds of prostatitis. Furthermore, Itza (2010) found that excessive ejaculation can cause pelvic musculature spasm and tenderness.

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Part 1 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men (Gallo, L., 2014). These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover dietary and toileting habits which can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

13 Evidence-Based Recommendations for Managing Prostatitis Related Pelvic Pain

Part One: 1-6

1) Avoid Alcohol

In six studies focusing on male pelvic pain (3 studies on prostatitis and 3 on interstitial cystitis concerning IC/BPS), regular alcohol intake was a habit found in those with high amounts of pain.

In the Collins study (2002), it was found that men who drunk more than two alcohol beverages per night had a major risk of history of prostatitis. Shorter et al. (2007), found that red and white wine, beer, champagne and other alcoholic beverages worsened the pelvic pain symptoms of female patients affected by IC/BPS.

2) Avoid Coffee

Drinking coffee increases risk of IC/BPS and pelvic pain according to Gallo and three studies that were reviewed in their study. Shorter et al. (2007) found that coffee (BOTH regular and decaf) worsened pelvic pain symptoms in 47-61% of patients.  In 2010, Dr. Shoskes, an expert on chronic pelvic pain, commented that avoiding caffeine is a simple and effective action to treat and prevent this condition.

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