Menu of Services

Female Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on Your First Visit

Read more:

Male Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on Your First Visit

Read more:

Pediatric Pelvic Floor Therapy: What To Expect on the First Visit

Read more:

Orthopaedic Services and Treatments

Read more:

Cancer Rehabilitation Treatments

Read more:

Certified InTone Treatments

Read more:

Fascial Stretch Therapy

Read more:

blog

Heather and her staff blog about male and female chronic pelvic pain, prostatitis, incontinence, upcoming events and more

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

May is Pelvic Pain Awareness month and healthy bowel habits are important component to consider in overall pelvic health.

What is your poop telling you?

A lot of our clients with pelvic floor dysfunction, pelvic pain, endometriosis, and prolapse have some trouble with their bowels. IBS and other bowel-related issues can cause abdominal pain, rectal pain, and pelvic floor problems. It’s a connection that is very important to consider!

Today we will discuss poop color, texture, and size. While many of us may turn our heads when we flush, there are some important details about your health that can be gathered from the color of your poop, so consider taking a gander at your poop before you flush it away.

Color

According to the Mayo Clinic, stool color can vary widely and still be considered normal. Most stool ranges in shades of brown and green. The variance in color is due to what you are eating as well as the amount of bile present in your stool. Bile is the fluid secreted by your gallbladder that digests fats in your GI system. Bile starts out a yellow-green color and slowly changes color from green to brown depending on what other substances are in your GI tract.

If your poop is bright red or black, you may have blood in your stool. If this is the case, go see a doctor.

More information about poop color and what it may tell you can be found below




(source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/stool-color/expert-answers/faq-20058080).

 

Stool quality

What it may mean

Possible dietary causes

Green

Food may be moving through the large intestine too quickly, such as due to diarrhea. As a result, bile doesn't have time to break down completely.

Green leafy vegetables, green food coloring, such as in flavored drink mixes or ice pops, iron supplements.

Light-colored, white or clay-colored

A lack of bile in stool. This may indicate a bile duct obstruction.

Certain medications, such as large doses of bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol) and other anti-diarrheal drugs.

Yellow, greasy, foul-smelling

Excess fat in the stool, such as due to a malabsorption disorder, for example, celiac disease.

Sometimes the protein gluten, such as in breads and cereals. See a doctor for evaluation.

Black

Bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as the stomach.

Iron supplements, bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol), black licorice.

Bright red

Bleeding in the lower intestinal tract, such as the large intestine or rectum, often from hemorrhoids.

Red food coloring, beets, cranberries, tomato juice or soup, red gelatin or drink mixes.

 

 

Texture

IBS can changes in the consistency of stools, usually harder or much softer than usual. At the clinic we use a handy scale called the Bristol Stool Scale to help therapists categorize your poop. The texture of your stool gives you an idea of how much time it has spent in the colon. Factors besides IBS that may affect poop texture include diet, fluid intake, medications, pelvic floor dysfunction, and lifestyle can be factors that play into the texture of your stool as well.


Reproduced from Dr KW Heaton, formerly Reader in Medicine at the University of Bristol. ©2000-2014, Norgine group of companies.

The Bristol Stool Chart shows seven categories of stool, in general:

Types 1-2 may indicate constipation

Types 3-4 indicate ideal stools that are easy to pass

Types 5-7 indicate diarrhea

However, if you are straining to evacuate your stools (pushing, holding your breath, turning your face red, etc.)- go see a pelvic floor therapist as you might be having some pelvic floor issues which might be contributing to your problem.

Size

Irritable bowel syndrome can cause your stools to be smaller, larger or narrower than usual.

According to the Mayo Clinic, if you have pencil thin poops every once in a while, it is probably harmless. However, if your poops are pencil thin for more than 1-2 weeks, it may indicate a narrowing or obstruction of the colon due to colon cancer or a pelvic floor dysfunction.

 

Other Changes


Consult your doctor immediately if your bowel changes are accompanied by rectal bleeding or severe abdominal pain. Pelvic floor therapy can help you if you are experiencing pelvic pain and voiding issues, so don’t be shy about contacting us if you are having any issues.

Resources

Blake, M. R., Raker, J. M., & Whelan, K. (2016). Validity and reliability of the Bristol Stool Form Scale in healthy adults and patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 44(7), 693–703.doi:10.1111/apt.13746 

Mayo Clinic, Stool color: When to worry Expert Answers from Michael F. Picco, M.D. Accessed on 4/10/19 from:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/stool-color/expert-answers/faq-20058080

Mayo Clinic, Narrow stools: Should I be concerned? Expert Answers from Michael F. Picco, M.D.https://www.mayoclinic.org/narrow-stools/expert-answers/faq-20057781

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Did you know that riding a bike that doesn’t fit your body can cause and exacerbate nerve and orthopedic problems? Avoid nerve, muscle and joint pain with the following tips!

Before We Begin: Ask for Help

If you are spinning at a gym or in a class, ask for assistance from cycling instructors if you need help setting up your bike. Everyone needs help doing this when they begin, so don't be shy!

If you are cycling at home, come see us at the clinic or have us come out to your house! Clinic owner Heather Jeffcoat, DPT does custom fit assessments in our Sherman Oaks office using the Peloton, and travels in the greater Los Angeles area.

Where is your tush?

Before you sit on the bike, know where you should be sitting!

Your sitting bones should be seated on the back (widest part) of your bike saddle. Sitting correctly on the bike will be one of the most important factors to keeping you from developing orthopedic or nerve issues.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

How to prevent back pain for your child

With the school year upon us, kids everywhere are settling into their routines including schlepping items from home to school and extracurricular activities.

Heavy backpacks can lead to back and shoulder pain, injuries, and soreness. Here are a few tips to stay healthy when using a backpack.

Symptoms to watch for:

Carrying a backpack that is too heavy for you can lead to back pain, spinal injuries down the road, as well as an injury to the brachial plexus, the nerve network that goes down the front of the neck and shoulder to your arms, hands, and fingers.

Here are some symptoms to watch out for:

  • Back Pain
  • Numbness, tingling, prickling, or burning sensations in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Weakness in the shoulders, arms, or hands.
  • Pain in the arms, hands, forearms, or shoulders
  • Pain that radiates down the arm
  • Neck and shoulder pain

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Childhood Constipation and how Pelvic Floor Therapy Can Help

Does your kiddo have a hard time passing bowel movements?

If the answer is yes, you are not alone. According to (Mugie et al. (2011) up to about 30% of children experience constipation. In fact, kids admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain are most often diagnosed with constipation (Caperell, Pitetti, & Cross, 2013).

Kids who don’t get treatment for their constipation may start falling into muscle holding patterns that persist into adulthood. This means that childhood constipation problems may lead to adult constipation and other pelvic floor issues.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

While occasional daytime and nighttime accidents (bowel and urine) are a normal part of younger childhood, kids can experience problematic urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction just like adults.

In this article we will discuss the signs of an underlying pelvic floor dysfunction in children and how pelvic floor therapy can help.

When is it a problem?

Occasional daytime and nighttime accidents are a normal part of growing up. However, if accidents are interfering with a kid’s social engagement, progress in school, or their self-image, then you may consider seeking extra help from a pediatric urologist or pelvic floor therapist.

Signs and Symptoms of Pediatric Incontinence or Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

  • Leaks urine or bowel with laughter (giggle incontinence), coughing, or exercise (jumping on a trampoline, sprinting, etc.)
  • Frequent urination and frequent urge to urinate
  • Chronic constipation or diarrhea
  • Chronic urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Daytime wetting that interferes with school, social engagement, or self image
  • Nighttime wetting that interferes with sleep, hygiene, or self image
  • Inability to fully void urine or evacuate bowel on the toilet

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Part 2 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease (Gallo, L. (2014).) outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men. These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover lifestyle and sexual habits that can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Part 1 of 2 of our Prostatitis Lifestyle Management Series

An article published in the Journal of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease outlines evidence-based recommendations to treat prostatitis related chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) in men (Gallo, L., 2014). These recommendations were well tolerated by clients and showed statistically significant reduction in symptoms caused by prostatitis and CPPS.  Today we will cover dietary and toileting habits which can help relieve pelvic pain.

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

What is Yoga?

Yoga is a form of exercise that utilizes movement for strength and flexibility, along with breathwork and mindfulness for reduction of stress and tension. Yoga has long been used therapeutically for a variety of neuromuscular, immunological, psychological, and pain disorders. It has also been linked to improvements in body awareness, improved cognition, flexibility and strength, as well as physiology (reducing stress hormones, improving cardiac function) (Schmalzl et al, 2015).

Prostatitis and Male Pelvic Pain

Chronic prostatitis, nonbacterial prostatitis, and chronic pelvic pain are all related conditions which negatively affect quality of life for the men who suffer from them. Symptoms vary, but are often described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. The pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.
According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis. About 90% of these instances cannot be tied to an active bacterial infection. Prostatitis affects men of all ages, unlike benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, which predominantly affect older men.

Yoga, Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, and Chronic Pain

Yoga can help both strengthen and increase flexibility of the pelvic floor muscles and surrounding musculature to better function and treat issues such as pain with urination, pain with ejaculation, and pain with bowel movements.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

This article will review how prostatitis can cause or contribute to chronic pelvic pain and what pelvic floor therapy can do to help alleviate it.

The Condition

Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis is sometimes described as a “headache in the pelvis” with pain symptoms affecting urinary and sexual function. It’s a tricky condition because as “nonbacterial” suggests, the pain and inflammation is not tied to a known bacterial infection, which can confuse both the patient as well as their healthcare providers. Yet, the pain is real and their negative affects on quality of life are real as well.  The pain caused by nonbacterial prostatitis can be disabling, preventing participation in valued activities and causing isolation and depression.

Prevalence

According to Harvard Medical School, prostatitis accounts for about 1.8 million visits to the doctor’s office in the United States each year. Between 9% to 16% of men of all ages experience prostatitis.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Happy Pride Month! Fusion Wellness & Physical Therapy is proud to be a supportive and inclusive orthopaedic and pelvic health center. Earlier this month, I attended the first ever PT-specific course for LGBTQ care in the US, with an emphasis on transgender care. The course covered many topics, notably pre-operative, intra-operative and postoperative recovery guidelines. While this is the second course I have taken on transgender care (with a third coming up in a few months), it was the first that was held primarily for the benefit of training physical therapists.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Girls Night Out: Better Sexual and Pelvic Health

Date:
Sunday, November 5, 2017

Time:
6:30-9:30PM

Venue:
The Rendition Room @ Vitello's
4349 Tujunga Ave., Studio City, CA 91604

Drinks and appetizers will be provided!

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Most people experience occassional constipation. Constipation isn’t just the inability to have a bowel movement, and includes the difficulty associated with bowel movements. Travel, inactivity, illness, and certain over the counter medications taken “as needed” commonly result in short-term or acute constipation. Constipation lasting longer than three months is considered chronic constipation. Chronic constipation should be treated by a doctor to prevent health complications. 

Chronic Constipation: Are you and your healthcare practitioner talking about the same thing? 

Clear communication is essential to working with doctors, but the general public often has only a rudimentary understanding of medical terms - including constipation. There is often a gap between the physician and the patient’s perception of constipation which can lead to confusion. (1, 2, 7, 10) A study of people who thought they had constipation showed that only a third actually fit the criteria for constipation, while the rest actually had Irritable Bowel Syndrome or other gastrointestinal disorders. (9) So what are the criteria for constipation? 

  • 2.png6.png8.png1.png2.png2.png
  • Visitors:
  • Today 46
  • |
  • Yesterday 53
  • |
  • This week 327
  • |
  • This month 1215
  • |
  • Total 268122

© 2013 Heather Jeffcoat, all rights reserved | Site credits

Our site uses cookies to implement some of its features. We encourage you to visit our Terms of Use page for more information.